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Information and Universal Design in Online Courses

  • Luciane Maria Fadel
  • Viviane H. KuntzEmail author
  • Vania R. Ulbricht
  • Claudia R. Batista
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9747)

Abstract

This paper aims to identify how the interface design of a Massive Open Online Course can incorporate the seven Principles of Universal Design. In order to do that, this paper begins with a literature review on Universal Design and interface design. This review is followed by a review on the WCAG 2.0 and a verification instrument is designed. The verification is then performed on a Coursera Course and aims to identify how the seven Principles of Universal Design are applied in this environment. The results suggest that the Coursera platform is a good example of Universal Design because the guidelines were followed. Therefore, Universal Design is a challenge that is possible to be implemented.

Keywords

Universal Design Online course Information design 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciane Maria Fadel
    • 1
  • Viviane H. Kuntz
    • 1
    Email author
  • Vania R. Ulbricht
    • 1
  • Claudia R. Batista
    • 2
  1. 1.Post Graduate Program in Knowledge, Engineering and Management, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC)FlorianópolisBrazil
  2. 2.Expressão Gráfica DepartmentFederal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC)FlorianópolisBrazil

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