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Book-Like Reader: Mirroring Book Design and Navigation in an E-Book Reader

  • Yuto KotajimaEmail author
  • Jiro Tanaka
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9732)

Abstract

This paper describes our design of the Book-Like Reader, an e-book reader interface that mirrors paper books. This study focuses on the characteristics of flexibility and lightweight navigation in paper books. We consider the important requirements for navigation to be the control method, the behavior of paper pages, and lightweight bookmarking. By satisfying these requirements, the user can handle an e-book intuitively like a paper book. Our reader is capable of the same user-friendly navigation as a paper book.

We have developed a prototype (as an Android application) with an Android tablet, two force sensitive resistors, and a microcomputer board. The touch display and the resistors are sufficient to detect the input. The application visualizes e-books (consisting of image files) like paper books using an OpenGL ES. Our Book-Like Reader has the aforementioned characteristics of paper books.

Keywords

Electronic book Mobile device User interface Android application 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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