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Towards a Digital Teaching Platform in Brazil: Findings from UX Experiments

  • Andrew Koster
  • Renata ZilseEmail author
  • Tiago Primo
  • Állysson Oliveira
  • Marcos Souza
  • Daniela Azevedo
  • Francimar Maciel
  • Fernando Koch
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9753)

Abstract

This work discusses the usability experiments conducted around a proof-of-concept implementation of a novel tablet-based Digital Teaching Platform (DTP). The platform is intended to address specific issues with tablet usage in a classroom setting, and address problems with technology adoption in education, particularly in Brazil. We evaluated the DTP in two separate studies, a Usability experiment in a laboratory setting, and an in-situ experiment in Brazilian classrooms, with the aim of identifying specific problems with the current solution, and identifying usage patterns that better engage students in the classroom. We found that our DTP leads, overall, to a very satisfactory experience. However, any such platform aimed at classroom usage should take special care to address note-taking, and tasks related to collaboration, sharing, and general social aspects of the classroom experience.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Koster
    • 1
  • Renata Zilse
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tiago Primo
    • 1
  • Állysson Oliveira
    • 1
  • Marcos Souza
    • 2
  • Daniela Azevedo
    • 2
  • Francimar Maciel
    • 2
  • Fernando Koch
    • 1
  1. 1.SAMSUNG Research Institute BrazilCampinasBrazil
  2. 2.SAMSUNG SIDIAManausBrazil

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