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Numerical Study of the Medicane of November 2014

  • I. PytharoulisEmail author
  • Ioannis T. Matsangouras
  • I. Tegoulias
  • S. Kotsopoulos
  • Theodore S. Karacostas
  • P. T. Nastos
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

A hurricane-like cyclone with an ‘eye’, eyewall convection and strong winds affected central Mediterranean basin on 7–8 November 2014. The maximum observed sustained wind speed was 22 m/s (tropical storm strength) at Lampedusa. Significant damages were reported from this island and the coastal regions of eastern Sicily. Thus, it is essential to study medicanes and calibrate the numerical weather prediction models in order to simulate them adequately. Operational ECMWF analyses are used together with the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting numerical model with the Advanced Research dynamic solver (WRF-ARW ver 3.7.1). The aims of this study are to simulate the system and investigate the sensitivity of the model on the microphysical scheme, the number of vertical levels and the global input dataset. The main characteristics of the medicane are represented in good agreement with observations and analyses, but, no single setup is able to provide the best reproduction of all its features.

Keywords

Tropical Cyclone Microphysical Scheme Spiral Band ECMWF Analysis Operational Numerical Weather Prediction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work has been supported by computational time granted by the Greek Research and Technology Network (GRNET) in the National HPC facility—ARIS—under project PR001009-COrRECT.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Pytharoulis
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ioannis T. Matsangouras
    • 2
    • 3
  • I. Tegoulias
    • 1
  • S. Kotsopoulos
    • 1
  • Theodore S. Karacostas
    • 1
  • P. T. Nastos
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Meteorology and Climatology, School of GeologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Laboratory of Climatology and Atmospheric Environment, Faculty of Geology and GeoenvironmentNational and Kapodistrian University of AthensAthensGreece
  3. 3.Department of Satellites and RadarsHellenic National Meteorological ServiceAthensGreece

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