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Near Real-Time Aerosol Predictions During the First Citizen Observatory Campaign in Greece

  • E. AthanasopoulouEmail author
  • O. Speyer
  • S. Apostolopoulou
  • S. Papageorgiou
  • V. Amiridis
  • E. Gerasopoulos
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Atmospheric Sciences book series (SPRINGERATMO)

Abstract

This study complements the results from the first citizens’ observatory campaign focusing on aerosol monitoring in 11 European cities (including Athens) during September 2015 (iSPEX-EU project). Instantaneous columnar aerosol measurements, obtained by citizens with their mobiles, are currently under process to produce aerosol optical thickness data. In parallel, high-resolution model simulations (COSMO-ART) near real-time were performed over Greece. Supplementary data from the regulatory AQ network of Athens reveal low surface PM2.5 values over Athens—reproduced by the model application—with prolonged and frequent Saharan dust intrusions. The direct radiative effects of low PM2.5 concentrations are calculated up to −16 W m−2 at the urban core, with a subsequent temperature decrease up to −0.4 K (surface values).

Keywords

PM10 Concentration Dust Event Urban Core Aerosol Optical Thickness Direct Radiative Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work has been supported by the project ACTRIS-2 Integrating Activities (IA), funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 654109). Computational time for model applications is  granted from the Greek Research and Technology Network (GRNET) in the National HPC facility—ARIS—under project ID ACRA. The set-up and preparation of COSMO-ART was performed in the frame of the project THESPIA of the action KRIPIS (GSRT), financed by Greece and the European Regional Development Fund of the EU in the frame of NSRF and the O.P. Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship and the Regional Operational Program of Attica. We appreciate the German Weather Service (DWD) for providing access to their forecast data records. The Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) is acknowledged for processing and providing the anthropogenic emission data.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Athanasopoulou
    • 1
    Email author
  • O. Speyer
    • 1
  • S. Apostolopoulou
    • 2
  • S. Papageorgiou
    • 2
  • V. Amiridis
    • 2
  • E. Gerasopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable DevelopmentNational Observatory of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote SensingNational Observatory of AthensAthensGreece

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