Methods and Philosophy of Science: Psychology, Historical Science and Inefficient Causation

Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 2)

Abstract

Ned Lebow’s work is not primarily driven by the philosophy of science. And although he is obviously interested in as clean a control of empirical findings as possible, methods primarily follow the needs of his empirical and theoretical problematiques and not the other way round. When he looks for coherence between his theory and meta-theory, he is driven by politics, ethics and political philosophy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Danish Institute for International StudiesCopenhagenDenmark

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