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Smart Sensor Microsystems: Application-Dependent Design and Integration Approaches

  • Minkyu JeEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

With the future filled with a trillion sensors on the way, there is a large variety in the forms of smart sensors for different applications existing or emerging, such as environmental monitoring, smart grid, green transportation, smart home and building, wearables, implants, and so on. The applications of sensors and corresponding use scenarios define desired form factors, operation frequencies and durations, energy sourcing and management strategies, communication distances and data rates, as well as control interfaces and protocols, leading to significantly different microsystem structures as well as design and integration approaches eventually. In this chapter, the application dependence of the microsystem structures and design/integration approaches are investigated, along with several examples of the smart sensor microsystem implementation across different applications introduced. While we find that the optimally crafted system designs and integration strategies can draw the maximum out of currently available technologies on one hand, the study on the other hand reveals the limitations, challenges, and bottlenecks of the technologies to overcome for a leap to the next stage of the sensor world.

Keywords

Smart sensors Microsystems Wireless communication Internet of things Medical devices Implantable blood flow sensor Neural recording Body-channel communication Wireless capsule endoscopy Integrated circuits 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the Center for Integrated Smart Sensors funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning as the Global Frontier Project.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Electrical EngineeringKorea Advanced Institute of Science and TechnologyYuseong-gu, DaejeonRepublic of Korea

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