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Sexuality

  • Sarah-Jane Page
  • Heather Shipley
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

The emerging study of sexuality within the sociology of religion is becoming a significant research area; both the reasons for this growth and the current scope of this research warrant broader attention. Much of the existing research interest focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex (LGBTQI) experiences, especially due to the perceived conflicts experienced between these identities. This chapter will argue that it is unhelpful to castigate religion exclusively as a sexuality-regressive space, noting how it is often rhetorically convenient for secular publics to view religion in this way. Instead, utilizing a “lived religion” approach, the nuances and complexities in the relationships between religion and sexuality can be explored. This approach will be facilitated through an examination of a broad range of issues pertinent to sexuality and religion, including gender and sexuality, counter-normative sexualities, LGBTQI experiences and youth sexualities. As heteronormative assumptions continue to pattern the experiences of many individuals – of varying sexualities, genders, ages and (non)religions – heteronormativity as a concept will be drawn upon throughout.

Keywords

Sexuality Gender LGBTQI Heteronormativity Youth Counter-normative sexualities Lived religion 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to extend special thanks to the Religion, Youth and Sexuality: A Multi-Faith Exploration project, the Religion and Diversity Project and the Religion, Gender and Sexuality among Youth in Canada project. We especially thank the principal investigators of these projects, Professor Andrew Kam-Tuck Yip, Professor Lori Beaman and Professor Pamela Dickey Young, respectively. We would also like to David Yamane who offered insightful comments on our preliminary chapter draft resulting in revisions that have strengthened our contribution.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Languages and Social SciencesAston UniversityBirminghamUK
  2. 2.Department of Classics and Religious StudiesUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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