Dynamic Modulus Properties of Objet Connex 3D Printer Digital Materials

Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

This paper examines the damping properties of digital materials from the Objet Connex 3D Printer from Stratsys. The Objet Connex printer is a unique 3D printer because in a single print job, ten different materials with different stiffness can be utilized. The printer utilizes two base materials and mixes them in different ratios to obtain varying stiffness levels. The first base material, VeroWhitePlusTM is a rigid opaque plastic and the second base material, TangoPlusTM is a rubbery translucent material. This 3D printer has a variety of applications including the development of metastructures for vibration suppression. It has been demonstrated that both the VeroWhitePlusTM and TangoPlusTM materials exhibit viscoelastic behavior but extensive studies have not be carried out to determine the Young’s Modulus and loss factor data in terms of frequency. This paper is the first step towards that goal. The paper begins by going into more detail about the properties of the printer and examines some previous work on determining the material properties. Next, the test method used it outlined and lastly the experimental set-up is described. In order to obtain data for a high range of frequencies, the material must be tested at various temperatures.

Keywords

Viscoelastic materials Additive manufacturing Oberst beam method Passive damping Vibration suppression 

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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