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Fetal MRI of the Brain and Spine

  • Marjolein H. G. DremmenEmail author
  • P. Ellen Grant
  • Thierry A. G. M. Huisman
Chapter

Abstract

Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is nowadays an established second-line imaging modality next to prenatal ultrasound (US) [1–3]. Ultrafast fetal MR sequences allow to “picture freeze” the fetus in utero without the need for sedation. The goal of fetal MRI is to offer an enhanced visualization and characterization of the pathologies detected by routine prenatal sonography, and it is therefore used as a problem-solving technique in a selected patient population. Prenatal sonography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating disorders related to the fetus and pregnancy; however, occasionally fetal MRI can identify subtle lesions that remained uncovered by US but may be essential for accurate diagnosis. Furthermore, fetal MRI contributes to selection of intrauterine treatment options and obstetric management, determines immediate postnatal care, and enhances parental counseling.

Keywords

Fetal magnetic resonance imaging Fetal development Brain malformation Spinal malformation Brain pathology Spinal pathology 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marjolein H. G. Dremmen
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • P. Ellen Grant
    • 3
  • Thierry A. G. M. Huisman
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Radiological ScienceJohns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of RadiologyErasmus MC – University Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyChildren’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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