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Parent Coaching

  • Kimberly Allen
Chapter

Abstract

Chapter 10 focuses on the application of parent coaching. Knowing parenting techniques is only part of what a family life coach needs to know to be effective at parent coaching. There are several theoretical foundations for parent coaching, and while the Adlerian parenting approach is the primary focus of this chapter, child development theories, parenting theories, and emotion coaching are also covered.

Furthermore, family life coaches must know how to translate knowledge about child development and parent child interactions in a way that is consistent with the coaching process. There is a delicate balance between the coaching process and relaying education, therefor a case study that highlights the importance of having both coaching skills and content knowledge for working with a family on a parenting issue is presented. Chapter 10 provides strategies and practices for how to translate knowledge about parent child interactions in a way that is consistent with coaching.

Keywords

Parent coaching Parenting Parent education Adlerian theory Child development 

Further Reading

  1. Dinkmeyer, D., McKay, G., & Dinkmeyer, D. (1997). The parent’s handbook: Systematic Training for Effective Parenting. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.Google Scholar
  2. Dreikurs, R. (1958). The challenge of parenthood. New York: Hawthorne Press.Google Scholar
  3. Gottman, J. (1998). Raising an emotional intelligent child: The heart of positive parenting. New York: Simon & Shuster.Google Scholar
  4. Nelson, J. N. (2006). Positive discipline. New York: Random House.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimberly Allen
    • 1
  1. 1.North Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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