Task-Oriented Grasp Planning Based on Disturbance Distribution

Chapter
Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 114)

Abstract

One difficulty of task-oriented grasp planning is task modeling. In this paper, a manipulation task was modeled by building a non-parametric statistical distribution model from disturbance data captured during demonstrations. This paper proposes a task-oriented grasp quality criterion based on distribution of task disturbance and uses the criterion to search for a grasp that covers the most significant part of the disturbance distribution. To reduce the computational complexity of the search in a high-dimensional robotic hand configuration space, as well as to avoid a correspondence problem, the candidate grasps are computed from a reduced configuration space that is confined by a set of given thumb placements and thumb directions. The proposed approach has been validated with a Barrett hand and a Shadow hand on several objects in simulation. The resulting grasps in the evaluation generated by our approach increase the coverage of frequently-occurring disturbance rather than the coverage of a large area with a scattered distribution.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of South FloridaTampaUSA

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