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Birth to Three: Early Intervention

  • Robin A. McWilliam
Chapter

Abstract

The formal system of supports for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families is early intervention under Part C of IDEA. The major activities undertaken in early intervention are home visits, family-centered practices, coaching, responsive teaching, routine-based interventions, service coordination, and transition to preschool. Challenges remaining to be solved are using models for the effective delivery of services, using technology, providing training and supervision, and offering specialized, inclusive classroom options.

Keywords

Infants Toddlers Family-centered practices Part C Birth to three Children with disabilities Early intervention Early childhood special education Early childhood Special education Children with special needs 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special Education and Multiple DisabilitiesUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA

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