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Critical Issues and Promising Practices for Teaching Play to Young Children with Disabilities

  • Erin E. BartonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Play contributes to the learning, development, and well-being of children. Play offers an ideal context for engaging with others in meaningful and mutually beneficial interactions. Play also promotes participation in natural environments in ways that advance learning and development. Early experiences that promote increasing complexity of play provide a foundation for future friendships, participation, and learning. Children with disabilities, however, play less often and use less complex play than their peers. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the intervention research related to increasing play skills in young children. Implications for research and practice also are described.

Keywords

Play Play development Play instruction Play measurement Pretend play Social play Children with disabilities Early intervention Early childhood special education Early childhood Special education Children with special needs 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special EducationPeabody College, Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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