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Like Minds, Like Mine: Seventeen Years of Countering Stigma and Discrimination Against People with Experience of Mental Distress in New Zealand

  • Ruth CunninghamEmail author
  • Debbie Peterson
  • Sunny Collings
Chapter

Abstract

In 1996 New Zealand was one of the first countries in the world to initiate a comprehensive national programme to combat stigma and discrimination against people with experience of mental illness. Combining national level social marketing and community-driven education and training with a range of other strategies, the programme became known as Like Minds, Like Mine and achieved international recognition as the ‘gold standard’ in stigma reduction initiatives. Serial evaluations have demonstrated success in shifting public attitudes, and there are indications that discriminatory behaviours are also reducing. A great deal has been learnt about the extent of social exclusion and discrimination experienced by New Zealanders living with mental illness and about effective strategies to change attitudes and counter discrimination. Seventeen years later the work of Like Minds, Like Mine to increase social inclusion and reduce discrimination continues. This chapter documents the origins, evolution and current status of the Like Minds, Like Mine programme (referred to as Like Minds).

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Illness Mental Health Service Social Inclusion Public Attitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This chapter reflects the views of the authors, and does not represent the views of Like Minds staff or funders. The authors would like to thank the following people who have generously spoken with us about their experiences of Like Minds, Like Mine: Taimi Allan, Egan Bidois, Darryl Bishop, Sheldon Brown, Judi Clemments, Sonja Eriksen, Sarah Gordon, Alex Handiside, Marge Jackson, Warren Lindberg, Virginia MacEwan, Vito Malo, Dean Manley, Mary O’Hagan, Janet Peters, Fale Puka, Tane Rangihuna, Mary Strang, Gerard Vaughn, Allan Wylie, and Ivan Yeo. Thanks also to Judi Clemments, Gerard Vaughn and Janet Peters for peer review.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Cunningham
    • 1
    Email author
  • Debbie Peterson
    • 2
  • Sunny Collings
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Public HealthUniversity of OtagoWellingtonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Social Psychiatry and Population Mental Health Research GroupUniversity of OtagoWellingtonNew Zealand
  3. 3.Dean’s DepartmentUniversity of OtagoWellingtonNew Zealand

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