Abstract

This chapter presents mindfulness and mindfulness-based intervention studies involving individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) in such a way as to allow practitioners in the field of IDDs to understand and make good use of mindfulness practices. We introduce mindfulness in its contemporary and traditional contexts. We then discuss why and how mindfulness-based interventions have been used for individuals with IDDs. We review mindfulness studies involving individuals with IDDs according to their intervention and research design and their methods. Finally, we present recommendations to strengthen the applications of mindfulness as an evidence-based practice.

Keywords

Mindfulness Mindfulness-based interventions Intellectual and developmental disabilities Mindfulness practices Evidence-based practice 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We are grateful to Patrick Kearney for his critical review and editorial guidance in the preparation of this chapter.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Learning Sciences Institute AustraliaAustralian Catholic UniversityBanyoAustralia
  2. 2.Medical College of GeorgiaAugusta UniversityAugustaUSA

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