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Sustainable Development of the Oceans: Closing the Gaps in the International Legal Framework

  • Glen Wright
  • Julien Rochette
  • Thomas Greiber
Chapter

Abstract

The world’s oceans are critical providers of ecosystem services and they are under increasing pressure from expanding and intensifying human activities. A range of international instruments and institutions aim to regulate maritime activities, though some legal gaps in the international framework remain. In particular, areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) lack an overarching regulatory framework, with no provisions for marine protected areas, environmental impact assessment, or access and benefit sharing in relation to marine genetic resources. There are also gaps and weakness in the international framework for the exploitation of offshore oil and gas resources. In this chapter, we highlight these gaps, outline relevant ongoing processes to fill them, and propose ways forward.

Keywords

Areas beyond national jurisdiction Marine protected areas Environmental impact assessment Access and benefit sharing Marine genetic resources Offshore oil and gas 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Marine PolicyInstitute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI)ParisFrance
  2. 2.Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI)ParisFrance
  3. 3.Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS)PotsdamGermany

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