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Case Study of Public Health

  • Clare BambraEmail author
  • Marcia Gibson
Chapter

Abstract

Umbrella reviews are an established method of locating, appraising, and synthesising systematic review-level evidence. Umbrella review methodology is though only just beginning to emerge as a well-used technique in public health research. This chapter therefore summarises some of the first umbrella reviews conducted in the field of public health with a thematic focus on the social determinants of health and how interventions might affect health inequalities. The chapter discusses some of the cross-cutting methodological and thematic lessons learned from this body of work and concludes by suggesting new directions for umbrella reviews within the field.

Keywords

Health inequality Overview of reviews Public health Social determinants of health Umbrella review 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Health and Inequalities ResearchDurham UniversityDurhamUK
  2. 2.MRC Social and Population Health UnitUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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