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Conclusions

Chapter

Abstract

In concluding this book, the author presents the initial thoughts in which context both 2D and 3D representations can be found regarding employment of digital methods for translating past, present, and future art and architecture objects into virtual reality. Approaches to this can be grouped into 3D city models, digital modelling of landscape, digital survey of building and landscape, employment of digital photo and video and their mapping and participative methods of mapping and modelling for decision making. This grouping led to the structure of the book, which is presented here. Authors from leading laboratories in the field in Europe, with whom the author collaborated through exchange visits, common applications, networks, and conference participation were invited either as authors or reviewers. The framework of the cooperation is presented. In detail, a review of Digital Landscape Architecture 2013 is given as an example. Conclusions are drawn on how this networking influenced the research presented in this book which contributed to the overall framework of NeDiMAH research, highlighting thus the way virtual mobility can contribute to research. Future initiatives are also presented.

Keywords

Virtual mobility Digital methods Networking Virtual reality labs 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.“Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban PlanningBucharestRomania

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