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Analysis of National Verses Long-Range Transport Contribution to Organic and Inorganic Aerosol Load in Selected Location in Poland

  • Barbara BłaszczakEmail author
  • Magdalena Reizer
  • Katarzyna Juda-Rezler
  • Ewa Krajny
  • Barbara Mathews
  • Krzysztof Klejnowski
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Complexity book series (SPCOM)

Abstract

The paper investigates PM2.5 levels and composition in 3 different locations in Poland for cold and warm period of 2013. The highest share of SOC and POC in PM2.5 was found in heating season, which was probably due to an increase in the activity of local emission sources of PM, especially biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion in residential sector, while SIA contribution in PM2.5 mass was relatively constant during heating and non-heating period at all 3 sites. During non-heating season air mass back trajectories were grouped into 5 clusters representing mostly westerly flows (50–72 %). During heating season the trajectories were grouped into 6 clusters coming mostly from eastern directions (54–64 %).

Keywords

Secondary Organic Aerosol Heating Season Westerly Flow Local Emission Source Secondary Inorganic Aerosol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Polish National Science Centre partly under PRELUDIUM funding scheme 2nd edition, Project no. UMO-2011/03/N/ST10/05542 and partly under OPUS funding scheme 2nd edition, Project no. UMO-2011/03/B/ST10/04624. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) for the provision of the HYSPLIT transport and dispersion model (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready.php).

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Błaszczak
    • 1
    Email author
  • Magdalena Reizer
    • 2
  • Katarzyna Juda-Rezler
    • 2
  • Ewa Krajny
    • 3
  • Barbara Mathews
    • 1
  • Krzysztof Klejnowski
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental EngineeringPolish Academy of SciencesZabrzePoland
  2. 2.Faculty of Environmental EngineeringWarsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Monitoring and Modeling of Air Pollution DepartmentInstitute of Meteorology and Water Management–National Research InstituteKatowicePoland

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