Initial Teacher Education and Assessment of Graduates in Australia

  • Diane Mayer
  • Andrea Allard
  • Julianne Moss
  • Mary Dixon
Chapter
Part of the Professional Learning and Development in Schools and Higher Education book series (PROD, volume 13)

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the impact of recent standards-based legislation and implementation in Australia designed to improve the quality of teacher education and examine the ways in which teacher educators are assessing graduates in relation to beginning teacher standards, the evidence they are using within the context of accreditation of their programs, and the impact this is having on the teacher education curriculum. We report on research into the implementation and evaluation of an authentic teacher assessment approach being used in one Australian university and argue that such an approach not only empowers pre-service teachers but also teacher educators.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Mayer
    • 1
  • Andrea Allard
    • 2
  • Julianne Moss
    • 2
  • Mary Dixon
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Education and Social WorkUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of Arts and EducationDeakin UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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