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Bootstrapping Confidence Intervals

  • Ross ParsonageEmail author
  • Maxine Pfannkuch
  • Chris J. Wild
  • Kate Aloisio

Abstract

Technology is changing the statistical practice of inference. In response to these changes, we are investigating teaching approaches for introducing confidence interval concepts via the bootstrap method. In this chapter, we briefly describe the instruction sequence including the dynamic visualization software we have developed. Some results from our pilot study, involving ten secondary school and university students, are presented. The implications of the findings for further research and development of inferential concepts are discussed.

Keywords

Secondary-university students Dynamic visual imagery Statistics instruction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is partly funded by a grant from the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (www.tlri.org.nz).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross Parsonage
    • 1
    Email author
  • Maxine Pfannkuch
    • 1
  • Chris J. Wild
    • 1
  • Kate Aloisio
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Smith CollegeNorthamptonUSA

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