Fast, Dynamically-Sized Concurrent Hash Table

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9232)

Abstract

We present a new design and a C++ implementation of a high-performance, cache-efficient hash table suitable for use in implementation of parallel programs in shared memory. Among the main design criteria were the ability to efficiently use variable-length keys, dynamic table resizing to accommodate data sets of unpredictable size and fully concurrent read-write access.

We show that the design is correct with respect to data races, both through a high-level argument, as well as by using a model checker to prove crucial safety properties of the actual implementation. Finally, we provide a number of benchmarks showing the performance characteristics of the C++ implementation, in comparison with both sequential-access and concurrent-access designs.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of InformaticsMasaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic

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