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Designing a Serious Game as a Diagnostic Tool

  • Pongpanote GongsookEmail author
  • Janneke Peijnenborgh
  • Erik van der Spek
  • Jun Hu
  • Francesco Bellotti
  • Riccardo Berta
  • Alessandro de Gloria
  • Francesco Curatelli
  • Chiara Martinengo
  • Matthias Rauterberg
  • Jos Hendriksen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9221)

Abstract

Serious games offer the potential to not only entertain and educate, but can also operate as a diagnostic tool. While designing a game with the goal of a diagnostic tool, we faced many challenges. In this paper, we share our experiences in dealing with these challenges in the iterations of designing, implementing, and evaluating such a tool.

Keywords

Serious game Diagnostic tool Game design 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate in Interactive and Cognitive Environments (ICE), which is funded by the EACEA Agency of the European Commission under EMJD ICE FPA n 2010-0012. We are also very grateful for the collaboration with {Dr. Jos Hendriksen, Prof. Dr. Hans Vles, Prof. Dr. Bert Aldenkamp, and Janneke Peijnenborgh MSc.} from Kempenhaeghe, Center for Neurological Learning Disabilities, and Christian Sallustro from Eindhoven University of Technology. This work also is co-funded by the EU under the FP7, in the Games and Learning Alliance (GaLA) Network of Excellence, Grant Agreement nr. 258169.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pongpanote Gongsook
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  • Janneke Peijnenborgh
    • 2
  • Erik van der Spek
    • 1
  • Jun Hu
    • 1
  • Francesco Bellotti
    • 3
  • Riccardo Berta
    • 3
  • Alessandro de Gloria
    • 3
  • Francesco Curatelli
    • 3
  • Chiara Martinengo
    • 4
  • Matthias Rauterberg
    • 1
  • Jos Hendriksen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Industrial DesignEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Kempenhaeghe, Center for Neurological Learning DisabilitiesHeezeThe Netherlands
  3. 3.ELIOS Lab – DITENUniversity of GenovaGenovaItaly
  4. 4.DIMA – University of GenovaGenovaItaly

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