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Eel Canyon Slump Scar and Associated Fluid Venting

  • Roberto Gwiazda
  • Charles K. Paull
  • David W. Caress
  • Tom Lorenson
  • Peter G. Brewer
  • Edward T. Peltzer
  • Peter M. Walz
  • Krystle Anderson
  • Eve Lundsten
Part of the Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research book series (NTHR, volume 41)

Abstract

Autonomous underwater vehicles have been used to characterize Eel Slump, a slide scar located south of Eel Canyon, California. The presence of a well developed dendritic network on the headwall with gullies tens of meters deep, thick sediment drape cover on the slide scar sole, and the absence of fresh surfaces on the scarp suggest that the mass failure(s) that produced this feature did not take place in the recent past. Thermogenic oil and gas emanating from a large mound in the sole of the slide scar were sampled with a remotely operated vehicle. Other distinctive morphologies observed from the seafloor of the slide scar indicate fluid seep has occurred at multiple sites within the slide scar sole.

Keywords

Eel canyon AUV Thermogenic gas Oil seep Eel slump 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Support for this project from The David and Lucile Packard Foundation is gratefully recognized. Thoughtful reviews by Drs. D. Brothers and K. Coble-Maiers helped improve this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Gwiazda
    • 1
  • Charles K. Paull
    • 1
  • David W. Caress
    • 1
  • Tom Lorenson
    • 2
  • Peter G. Brewer
    • 1
  • Edward T. Peltzer
    • 1
  • Peter M. Walz
    • 1
  • Krystle Anderson
    • 1
  • Eve Lundsten
    • 1
  1. 1.Monterey Bay Aquarium Research InstituteMoss LandingUSA
  2. 2.United States Geological SurveySanta CruzUSA

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