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Constructing Awareness Through Speech, Gesture, Gaze and Movement During a Time-Critical Medical Task

  • Zhan ZhangEmail author
  • Aleksandra Sarcevic
Conference paper

Abstract

We conducted a video-based study to examine how medical teams construct and maintain awareness of what is going on in the environment during a time-critical, collaborative task—endotracheal intubation. Drawing on a theme that characterizes work practices in collaborative work settings—reading a scene—we examine both vocal and non-vocal actions (e.g., speech, body movement, gesture, gaze) of team members participating in this task to understand how these actions are used to display status of one’s work or to acquire information about the work status of others. While each action modality was helpful in constructing awareness to some extent, it posed different challenges, requiring team members to combine both vocal and non-vocal actions to achieve awareness about each other’s activities and their temporal order. We conclude by discussing different types of non-vocal actions, their purpose, and the need for computational support in this dynamic work setting.

Keywords

Team Member Respiratory Therapist Emergency Medical Team Trauma Team Bedside Nurse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. #1253285. We would like to thank our research team members for their support, as well as to the medical staff at the research site for their participation. Thanks also to the anonymous reviewers for their constructive suggestions and recommendations.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Computing and Informatics, Drexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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