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Effects of Glutathione Concentration in the Root Zone and Glutathione Treatment Period on Cadmium Partitioning in Oilseed Rape Plants

  • Shin-ichi Nakamura
  • Hikari Kondo
  • Nobuo Suzui
  • Yong-Gen Yin
  • Satomi Ishii
  • Naoki Kawachi
  • Hiroki Rai
  • Hiroyuki Hattori
  • Shu Fujimaki
Part of the Proceedings of the International Plant Sulfur Workshop book series (PIPSW)

Abstract

Glutathione is a sulfur-containing peptide involved in various aspects of plant metabolism. Glutathione is also known to have effects on heavy metal responses in plants. In our previous work, we have found glutathione, applied to roots site-specifically, inhibited cadmium (Cd) translocation from roots to shoots and Cd accumulation in shoots in oilseed rape plants. In addition, we succeeded in visualizing inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Cd by using a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). In this work, the effects of glutathione concentration in the root zone (hydroponic solution) and the glutathione treatment period on Cd partitioning in oilseed rape plants were investigated. Our experimental results demonstrated that glutathione, exceeding a certain concentration in the root zone, is needed to trigger inhibition of Cd translocation, and that treatment time from the start of glutathione application had different effects on Cd partitioning in oilseed rape plants.

Keywords

Root Zone Plant Body Hydroponic Solution Glutathione Concentration Oilseed Rape Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully thank Dr. Ken’ichi Ogawa (Research Institute for Biological Sciences Okayama) for providing us with GSSG and Mr. H. Suto (Tokyo Nuclear Services Co., Ltd) for his technical assistance in producing 107Cd by ion beam irradiation. This study was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (no. 23380194, 26292183 to S.N. and no. 17380194, 23380155 to S.F.).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shin-ichi Nakamura
    • 1
  • Hikari Kondo
    • 1
  • Nobuo Suzui
    • 2
  • Yong-Gen Yin
    • 2
  • Satomi Ishii
    • 2
  • Naoki Kawachi
    • 2
  • Hiroki Rai
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Hattori
    • 1
  • Shu Fujimaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological Production, Faculty of Bioresource SciencesAkita Prefectural UniversityShimoshinjo-Nakano, AkitaJapan
  2. 2.Radiotracer Imaging Group, Quantum Beam Science CenterJapan Atomic Energy AgencyTakasakiJapan

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