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LiverDefense: An Educational Tower Defense Game as an Evaluation Platform

  • Julia BrichEmail author
  • Julian Frommel
  • Katja Rogers
  • Adrian Brückner
  • Martin Weidhaas
  • Tamara Dorn
  • Sarah Mirabile
  • Valentin Riemer
  • Claudia Schrader
  • Michael Weber
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9090)

Abstract

This paper presents LiverDefense, an educational tower defense game illustrating the basic functions of the human liver. LiverDefense can be adapted with regard to its degree of difficulty via XML input files. Thus, researchers without programming skills can customize the game easily according to their needs. As such, it was tested in a user study to explore the effect of perceived control settings on players’ affective states, and learning outcomes.

Keywords

Serious games Education Evaluation platform Tower defense 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Brich
    • 1
    Email author
  • Julian Frommel
    • 1
  • Katja Rogers
    • 1
  • Adrian Brückner
    • 1
  • Martin Weidhaas
    • 1
  • Tamara Dorn
    • 1
  • Sarah Mirabile
    • 1
  • Valentin Riemer
    • 1
  • Claudia Schrader
    • 1
  • Michael Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Ulm UniversityUlmGermany

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