Tinea Cruris

  • Danya Reich
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
  • Bobby Buka
Chapter

Abstract

A 33-year-old male patient visited Primary Care with an itchy, scaly inguinal rash, exacerbated by warm weather and exercise. The patient was treated for tinea cruris. Tinea cruris, commonly called “jock itch,” is a fungal infection affecting the groin and medial thighs. Tinea cruris presents as an erythematous, confluent, pruritic, and scaling rash. It commonly affects adult men and athletes. Individuals with tinea cruris may also present with tinea pedis (fungal infection of the feet). The diagnosis is usually clinical, and can be confirmed by KOH test if necessary. Tinea cruris is treated with imidazole or allylamine topical antifungals. Oral antifungals are indicated for severe or recurrent infections. If tinea pedis is present it should also be treated in order to prevent future autoinfection. Over-the-counter antifungal powders may be recommended as prophylactic therapy.

Keywords

Tinea cruris Jock itch Groin Fungus Fungal Infection Dermatophyte Antifungal Trichophyton 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danya Reich
    • 1
  • Corinna Eleni Psomadakis
    • 2
  • Bobby Buka
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineMount Sinai School of Medicine Attending Mount Sinai Doctors/Beth Israel Medical Group-WilliamsburgBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.School of Medicine Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of DermatologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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