Abstract

Occupational therapists contribute to the care of children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) by focusing on activities and goals that are meaningful to the individuals and their families. Relevant performance areas include cognitive, sensory, perceptual, motor and psychosocial activities. Goals for intervention can range from self-care to supporting participation in a work environment. The ultimate goal is to foster community integration and participation. Occupational therapy assessment is designed to understand the individual’s strengths and areas of concern, within the context of the current environment and family/community culture. In this chapter, the types of interventions for individuals with IDD at different life stages are discussed, and examples of evidence-based outcomes are presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ostrow School of Dentistry, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational TherapyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Southern California Keck School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Division of Occupational Science and Occupational TherapyUniversity of Southern California, Ostrow School of DentistryLos AngelesUSA

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