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Polly: Telepresence from a Guide’s Shoulder

  • Don Kimber
  • Patrick Proppe
  • Sven Kratz
  • Jim Vaughan
  • Bee Liew
  • Don Severns
  • Weiqing Su
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8927)

Abstract

Polly is an inexpensive, portable telepresence device based on the metaphor of a parrot riding a guide’s shoulder and acting as proxy for remote participants. Although remote users may be anyone with a desire for ‘tele-visits’, we focus on limited mobility users. We present a series of prototypes and field tests that informed design iterations. Our current implementations utilize a smartphone on a stabilized, remotely controlled gimbal that can be hand held, placed on perches or carried by wearable frame. We describe findings from trials at campus, museum and faire tours with remote users, including quadriplegics. We found guides were more comfortable using Polly than a phone and that Polly was accepted by other people. Remote participants appreciated stabilized video and having control of the camera. One challenge is negotiation of movement and view control. Our tests suggest Polly is an effective alternative to telepresence robots, phones or fixed cameras.

Keywords

Telepresence Image stabilization Remote guiding Wearable Gimbal User feedback Iterative design 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Kimber
    • 1
  • Patrick Proppe
    • 1
  • Sven Kratz
    • 1
  • Jim Vaughan
    • 1
  • Bee Liew
    • 1
  • Don Severns
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weiqing Su
    • 2
  1. 1.FX Palo Alto LabCaliforniaUSA
  2. 2.University of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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