International Workshop on Computational Color Imaging

CCIW 2015: Computational Color Imaging pp 236-242 | Cite as

Estimating the Colors of Paintings

  • Sérgio M. C. Nascimento
  • João M. M. Linhares
  • Catarina A. R. João
  • Kinjiro Amano
  • Cristina Montagner
  • Maria J. Melo
  • Marcia Vilarigues
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9016)

Abstract

Observers can adjust the spectrum of illumination on paintings for optimal viewing experience. But can they adjust the colors of paintings for the best visual impression? In an experiment carried out on a calibrated color monitor images of four abstract paintings obtained from hyperspectral data were shown to observers that were unfamiliar with the paintings. The color volume of the images could be manipulated by rotating the volume around the axis through the average (a*, b*) point for each painting in CIELAB color space. The task of the observers was to adjust the angle of rotation to produce the best subjective impression from the paintings. It was found that the distribution of angles selected for data pooled across paintings and observers could be described by a Gaussian function centered at 10o, i.e. very close to the original colors of the paintings. This result suggest that painters are able to predict well what compositions of colors observers prefer.

Keywords

Colors of paintings Color vision Art visualization Color rendering Aesthetics 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sérgio M. C. Nascimento
    • 1
  • João M. M. Linhares
    • 1
  • Catarina A. R. João
    • 1
  • Kinjiro Amano
    • 2
  • Cristina Montagner
    • 3
  • Maria J. Melo
    • 3
  • Marcia Vilarigues
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre of Physics, Campus de GualtarUniversity of MinhoBragaPortugal
  2. 2.School of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  3. 3.Department of Conservation and Restauration, Faculdade de Ciências e TecnologiaUniversidade Nova de LisboaCaparicaPortugal

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