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Lights, Camera, Action! Business Process Movies for Online Process Discovery

  • Andrea Burattin
  • Marta Cimitile
  • Fabrizio Maria Maggi
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing book series (LNBIP, volume 202)

Abstract

Nowadays, organizational information systems are able to collect high volumes of data in event logs every day. Through process mining techniques, it is possible to extract information from such logs to support organizations in checking process conformance, detecting bottlenecks, and carrying on performance analysis. However, to analyze such “big data” through process mining, events coming from process executions (in the form of event streams) must be processed on-the-fly as they occur. The work presented in this paper is built on top of a technique for the online discovery of declarative process models presented in our previous work. In particular, we introduce a tool providing a dynamic visualization of the models discovered over time showing, as a “process movie”, the sequence of valid business rules at any point in time based on the information retrieved from an event stream. The effectiveness of the visualizer is validated through an event stream pertaining to health insurance claims handling in a travel agency.

Keywords

Online process discovery Dynamic process model visualization Event stream analysis Declarative process models  Concept drifts Operational decision support 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The work of Andrea Burattin is supported by the Eurostars-Eureka project PROMPT (E!6696).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Burattin
    • 1
  • Marta Cimitile
    • 2
  • Fabrizio Maria Maggi
    • 3
  1. 1.University of PaduaPaduaItaly
  2. 2.Unitelma Sapienza UniversityRomeItaly
  3. 3.University of TartuTartuEstonia

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