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Taurine 9 pp 765-772 | Cite as

Taurine Supplementation Reduces Eccentric Exercise-Induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Men

  • Song-Gyu Ra
  • Nobuhiko Akazawa
  • Youngju Choi
  • Tomoko Matsubara
  • Satoshi Oikawa
  • Hiroshi Kumagai
  • Koichiro Tanahashi
  • Hajime Ohmori
  • Seiji MaedaEmail author
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 803)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effects of taurine supplementation on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and muscle damage after high-intensity eccentric exercise (ECC) in healthy young men. Twenty-nine healthy young men were recruited and randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n = 14) or taurine supplementation (n = 15) in a double-blind manner. Participants ingested either 2.0 g of placebo or taurine supplement three times a day for 2 weeks before and 3 days after high-intensity ECC. Two weeks after starting supplementation, participants performed two sets of unilateral maximal-effort ECC of the elbow flexors on a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer. Each set consisted of 20 contractions with each contraction lasting 3 s and repeated every 9 s, and a 4 min period of rest in between sets. DOMS (evaluated by the visual analogue scale), upper arm circumference (CIR), elbow range of motion (ROM), and parameters of muscle damage including serum myoglobin (Mb) and creatine kinase (CK) levels, were measured before exercise and for 4 days after ECC. The severity of DOMS 2 days after ECC was significantly less in the taurine group than in the placebo group. The area under the curve for DOMS was also significantly smaller in the taurine group. However, taurine supplementation did not affect muscle damage (CIR, ROM, and serum Mb level and CK activity) after ECC. These results suggest that taurine supplementation effectively decreases DOMS after high-intensity ECC in young healthy men.

Keywords

Delayed onset muscle soreness Eccentric exercise Muscle damage Taurine 

Abbreviations

ANOVA

Analysis of variance

AUC

Area under the curve

BEx

Before exercise

CIR

Upper arm circumference

CK

Creatine kinase

DOMS

Delayed onset muscle soreness

ECC

Eccentric exercise

Mb

Myoglobin

MIF

Maximal isometric force

ROM

Range of motion

ROS

Reactive oxygen spices

VAS

Visual analogue scale

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Dr. Ryuichi Ajisaka, Dr. Yoshio Nakata, and Dr. Nobutake Shomojo for scientific and technical support. We also thank Mr. Ryota Higashino for providing the blood sample collected from the participants. The present study was supported by a grant from Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., (Tokyo, Japan) and a Grant-in-Aid for the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Song-Gyu Ra
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nobuhiko Akazawa
    • 2
    • 3
  • Youngju Choi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tomoko Matsubara
    • 2
    • 4
  • Satoshi Oikawa
    • 4
  • Hiroshi Kumagai
    • 2
    • 4
  • Koichiro Tanahashi
    • 2
    • 4
  • Hajime Ohmori
    • 1
  • Seiji Maeda
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Faculty of Health and Sport SciencesUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Japan Society for the Promotion of ScienceTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan
  4. 4.Graduate School of Comprehensive Human SciencesUniversity of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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