Using the I-LEARN Model to Design Information Literacy Instruction

  • Stacey Greenwell
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 492)

Abstract

An experimental study examined whether information literacy skills instruction designed using the I-LEARN model increased student (N=112) understanding and application of information literacy concepts. While the analysis of the results of pre- and post-test scores and scores on a citation analysis showed that there was no significant difference between the two groups, students in the experimental group used the I-LEARN-designed research guide more often that students in the control group. This warrants further study, and the author is currently working with others to use I-LEARN as a framework to design research guides.

Keywords

Instructional design I-LEARN instructional technology course guides LibGuides instructional strategies 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stacey Greenwell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Kentucky LibrariesLexingtonUSA

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