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Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas

  • Ibrahim Aldoss
  • Auayporn NademaneeEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 165)

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (alloHCT) has emerged as a potential curative treatment for advanced non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), especially for patients with chemorefractory disease, relapsed after prior autologous HCT and those with relapsed lymphoma who failed to collect adequate stem cells for autologous HCT. There are several phase II studies supported the role of alloHCT in low-grade lymphomas, but the data is scarce on the other subtypes of lymphomas. However, retrospective registries studies highlighted the inferior outcomes of alloHCT in aggressive lymphomas, with unacceptable higher relapse rate and non-relapse mortality when compared to low-grade lymphomas. Patients with chemorefractory disease and those with active disease at alloHCT had poor outcome. Therefore, incorporation of new target therapies to induce remission prior to transplant or as a bridge to alloHCT may lead to better outcome of alloHCT in NHL. Furthermore, well design prospective studies of alloHCT in NHL and employment of novel transplant approaches tailored toward specific histological subtype are urgently needed.

Keywords

Allogeneic HCT for lymphoma Transplantation for NHL Reduced-intensity allo-HCT for NHL 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.City of Hope National Medical CenterHematology and Hematopoietic Cell TransplantationDuarteUSA

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