Advertisement

Implementing New Technologies to Support Social Justice Pedagogy

  • Susan P. O’Hara
  • Deborah A. PittaEmail author
  • Robert H. Pritchard
  • Julie M. Webb
Chapter

Abstract

Our research and development work in classrooms, and with teachers in professional development settings, has convinced us that the use of new technologies can promote critical inquiry and reflective discourse in the classroom in support of social justice pedagogies. In this chapter, we present a set of frames that articulate high-impact practices and instructional moves for facilitating critical inquiry and reflective discourse in secondary classrooms in support of social justice pedagogies. Classroom vignettes demonstrate specific ways that a variety of technologies can be implemented to support enactment of these practices. The following questions guide the organization of this chapter: (1) What is the research base for using new technologies to facilitate critical inquiry and reflective discourse in support of social justice pedagogies? (2) What are some high-impact instructional practices for using new technologies to facilitate critical inquiry and reflective discourse in support of social justice pedagogies? (3) How can teachers use new technologies to enact high-impact practices in support of social justice pedagogies? (4) What are the implications of this work for teacher professional development and instructional capacity building?

Keywords

New technologies High-impact instructional practices Essential practice frames Instructional capacity building 

References

  1. Ayers, W., Hunt, J., & Quinn, T. (1998). Teaching for social justice: A democracy and education reader. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  2. CCSS. (2012a). Application of common core state standards for english learners. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/assets/application-for-english-learners.pdf.
  3. CCSS. (2012b). Common core state standards for english language arts & literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/assets/application-for-english-learners.pdf.
  4. Cranton, P. (2006). Understanding and promoting transformative learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  5. Garcia, A., Seglem, R., & Share, J. (2013). Transforming teaching and learning through critical media literacy pedagogy. LEARNing Landscapes, 6(2), 109–124.Google Scholar
  6. Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2–3), 87–105.Google Scholar
  7. Guthrie, K. L., & McCracken, H. (2010a). Promoting reflective discourse through connectivity: Conversations around service-learning experiences. In L. Shedletsk & J. E. Aitken (Eds.), Cases on online discussion and interaction: Experiences and outcomes. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.Google Scholar
  8. Guthrie, K. L., & McCracken, H. (2010b). Making a difference online: Facilitating service-learning through distance education. The Internet and Higher Education, 13(3), 153–157.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Hobbs, R. (2011). Digital and media literacy: Connecting culture and classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.Google Scholar
  10. Hull, G., & Moje, E. (2012, January). What is the development of literacy the development of? Paper presented at the Understanding Language Conference, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.Google Scholar
  11. Jaquith, A. (2009). The creation and use of instructional resources: The puzzle of professional development. Education. ProQuest Dissertations.Google Scholar
  12. Jaquith, A. (2012). Building instructional capacity: A research brief. Cset.standford.edu/instructional capacity.Google Scholar
  13. Jaquith, A. (2013). Instructional capacity: How to build it. Educational Leadership, 71(2), 56–61. Google Scholar
  14. Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Clinton, K., Weigel, M., & Robison, A. (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st Century. Chicago, IL: The MacArthur Foundation.Google Scholar
  15. Kellner, D., & Share, J. (2007). Critical media literacy, democracy, and the reconstruction of education. In D. Macedo & S. R. Steinberg (Eds.), Media literacy: A reader (pp. 3–23). New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  16. Luke, A., & Dooley, K. (2007). Critical literacy and second language. In E. Hinkel (Ed.), Handbook of research in second language teaching and learning (Vol. 2). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Mandell, A., & Herman, L. (2007). The study and transformation of experience. Journal of Transformative Education, 5(4), 339–353. Retrieved from http://jtd.sagepub.com/content/5/4/339.abstract.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Merryfield, M. M. (2003). Like a veil: Cross-cultural experiential learning online. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 3(2), 146–171.Google Scholar
  19. Merryfield, M. M. (2006). WebCT, PDS, and democratic spaces in teacher education. International Journal of Social Education, 21(1), 73–94.Google Scholar
  20. Meyers, S. (2008). Using transformative pedagogy when teaching online. College Teaching, 56(4), 219–224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Morrell, E. (2004). Becoming critical researchers: Literacy and empowerment for urban youth. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  22. Morrell, E. (2007). Critical literacy and popular culture in urban education: Toward a pedagogy of access and dissent. In C. Clark & M. Blackburn (Eds.), Working with/in the local: New directions in literacy research for political action. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  23. Morrell, E. (2008). Critical literacy and urban youth: Pedagogies of access, dissent, and liberation. New York: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  24. Myers, J. & Beach, R. (2004). Constructing critical literacy practices through technology tools and inquiry. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 4(3), 257–268. Google Scholar
  25. Myers, J., & Beach, R. (2004). Constructing critical literacy practices through technology tools and inquiry. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 4(3), 257–268.Google Scholar
  26. O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. H. (2009). Using hypermedia to teach vocabulary in grades 6–12. Columbus, OH: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  27. O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. (2012). Professional degree programs for the development of accomplished teachers: A case for the National Board Certification process. Journal of Educational Research and Practice (JERAP), 2(1), 54–73.Google Scholar
  28. O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. (2013). Learning to integrate new technologies into teaching and learning through a design-based model of professional development. The Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 21(2), 203–223.Google Scholar
  29. O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. (2014). Using new technologies to support the academic language and literacy development of adolescent English learners. EdTechnology Ideas, 1(3).Google Scholar
  30. Prensky, M. (2010). Teaching digital natives: Partnering for real learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.Google Scholar
  31. Pritchard, R., O’Hara, S., & Zwiers, J. (2014). Using new technologies to engage and support English learners in mathematics classrooms. In D. Polly (Ed.), Cases on technology and common core mathematics standards. Hersey, PA: IGI Global.Google Scholar
  32. Rovai, A. (2002). Building sense of community at a distance. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 3(1). Retrieved from http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/viewArticle/79/152.
  33. White, T., Booker, A., Ching, C. C., & Martin, L. (2012). Integrating digital and mathematical practices across contexts: A manifesto for mobile learning. International Journal of Learning and Media, 3(3), 7–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Zwiers, J., O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. (2014a). Conversing to fortify literacy, language, and learning. Voices from the Middle, 22(1), 10–14.Google Scholar
  35. Zwiers, J., O’Hara, S., & Pritchard, R. (2014b). Common Core Standards in diverse classrooms: Essential practices for developing academic language and disciplinary literacy. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan P. O’Hara
    • 1
  • Deborah A. Pitta
    • 1
    Email author
  • Robert H. Pritchard
    • 1
  • Julie M. Webb
    • 1
  1. 1.REEd at University of California Davis School of EducationDavisUSA

Personalised recommendations