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User Profiling: Towards a Facebook Game that Reveals Cognitive Style

  • Angeliki AntoniouEmail author
  • Ioanna Lykourentzou
  • Jenny Rompa
  • Eric Tobias
  • George Lepouras
  • Costas Vassilakis
  • Yannick Naudet
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8605)

Abstract

This paper presents an innovative approach based on social-network gaming, which will extract players’ cognitive styles for personalization purposes. Cognitive styles describe the way individuals think, perceive and remember information and can be exploited to personalize user interaction. Questionnaires are usually employed to identify cognitive styles, a tedious process for most users. Our approach relies on a Facebook game for discovering potential visitors’ cognitive styles with an ultimate goal of enhancing the overall visitors’ experience in the museum. By hosting such a game on the museum’s webpage and on Facebook, the museum aims to attract new visitors, as well as to support the user profiling process.

Keywords

User Profile Cognitive Style Museum Visit Game Feature Personalized Application 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The above research is partly funded under the European Union Seventh Framework Program Experimedia project, Contract No. 287966. We would also like to thank the students of the Departments of Computer Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese for participating in the pilot studies.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angeliki Antoniou
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ioanna Lykourentzou
    • 2
  • Jenny Rompa
    • 1
  • Eric Tobias
    • 2
  • George Lepouras
    • 1
  • Costas Vassilakis
    • 1
  • Yannick Naudet
    • 2
  1. 1.University of PelponneseTripolisGreece
  2. 2.CPR Henri TudorLuxembourgLuxembourg

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