“A New Era in the Development of Our Science”: The American Mathematical Research Community, 1920-1950

Chapter
Part of the Trends in the History of Science book series (TRENDSHISTORYSCIENCE)

Abstract

It was the end of August 1950 and some 2300 mathematicians had gathered from all over the world in Cambridge, Massachusetts for the eleventh International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM). An ICM had never before been held in the United States, and the American mathematical research community had a point to make.

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Archival Sources

  1. [AMS Papers]: American Mathematical Society Papers, John Hay Library, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.Google Scholar
  2. [Birkhoff]: George David Birkhoff Papers, Harvard University Archives, Pusey Library, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
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  6. [Wilder]: Raymond L. Wilder Papers, 1914–1982, Archives of American Mathematics, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departments of History and MathematicsUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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