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Exploring the Causal Structure Between Perceived Corporate Reputation and Consumer Satisfaction – an Experimental Investigation

  • Sabrina Helm
  • Ina Garnefeld
  • Julia Spelsiek
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science book series (DMSPAMS)

Abstract

Corporate reputation and consumer satisfaction can both be regarded as important drivers of a firm’s competitive advantage (Balmer and Greyser 2003; Fombrun 1996, Fornell 1992). Investigating the antecedents and consequences of these two constructs is of growing interest for academic research and marketing practice alike. Reputation has been shown to be a determinant in purchase decision making (Carmeli and Tishler 2005). Reputation serves as a quality signal that reduces uncertainty of consumers prior to a purchase decision. Building a favorable reputation is therefore deemed an effective way to gain market access and acceptance. After instigating a transaction with a new customer, achieving high rates of customer satisfaction becomes an important goal for firms as satisfaction is viewed as one of the major determinants of customer repurchase and word-of-mouth (Anderson and Sullivan 1993).

Keywords

Customer Satisfaction Causal Structure Purchase Decision Corporate Reputation Consumer Satisfaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sabrina Helm
    • 1
  • Ina Garnefeld
    • 1
  • Julia Spelsiek
    • 1
  1. 1.HoustonUSA

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