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Imaging Flow Cytometry and High-Throughput Microscopy for Automated Macroscopic Morphological Analysis of Filamentous Fungi

  • Aydin Golabgir
  • Daniela Ehgartner
  • Lukas Neutsch
  • Andreas E. Posch
  • Peter Sagmeister
  • Christoph Herwig
Chapter
Part of the Fungal Biology book series (FUNGBIO)

Abstract

Traditional methods for automated and high-throughput morphological analysis of filamentous fungi can be time-consuming and difficult. Here, two suitable image acquisition methods and subsequent image and data processing steps are presented. The acquisition methods are based on imaging flow cytometry and whole-slide microscopy. Guidelines for developing customized image and data analysis routines for satisfying individual research requirements are presented.

Keywords

Automated morphological analysis Morphological characterization Imaging flow cytometry Whole-slide microscopy Filamentous fungi 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Sandoz GmbH for providing the strains and guidance. Financial support was provided by the Austrian research funding association (FFG) under the scope of the COMET program within the research network “Process Analytical Chemistry (PAC)” (contract # 825340).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aydin Golabgir
    • 1
  • Daniela Ehgartner
    • 2
  • Lukas Neutsch
    • 3
  • Andreas E. Posch
    • 2
  • Peter Sagmeister
    • 4
  • Christoph Herwig
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Division Biochemical EngineeringVienna University of TechnologyViennaAustria
  2. 2.CD Laboratory for Mechanistic and Physiological Methods for Improved BioprocessesViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Biochemical EngineeringVienna University of TechnologyViennaAustria
  4. 4.Vienna University of TechnologyGrazAustria

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