Wearable Self Sufficient MFC Communication System Powered by Urine

  • Majid Taghavi
  • Andrew Stinchcombe
  • John Greenman
  • Virgilio Mattoli
  • Lucia Beccai
  • Barbara Mazzolai
  • Chris Melhuish
  • Ioannis A. Ieropoulos
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8717)

Abstract

A new generation of self-sustainable and wearable Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is introduced. Two different types of energy - chemical energy found in urine and mechanical energy harvested by manual pumping - were converted to electrical energy. The wearable system is fabricated using flexible MFCs with urine used as the feedstock for the bacteria, which was pumped by a manual foot pump. The pump was developed using check valves and soft tubing. The MFC system has been assembled within a pair of socks.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Majid Taghavi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Andrew Stinchcombe
    • 1
  • John Greenman
    • 4
  • Virgilio Mattoli
    • 2
  • Lucia Beccai
    • 2
  • Barbara Mazzolai
    • 2
  • Chris Melhuish
    • 1
  • Ioannis A. Ieropoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Bristol Robotics LaboratoryUniversity of the West of EnglandBristolUK
  2. 2.Center for Micro-BioRoboticsIstituto Italiano di TecnologiaPontedera (PI)Italy
  3. 3.BioRobotics InstituteScuola Superiore Sant’AnnaPontederaItaly
  4. 4.Faculty of Health and Applied SciencesUniversity of the West of EnglandBristolUK

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