Wearable Self Sufficient MFC Communication System Powered by Urine

  • Majid Taghavi
  • Andrew Stinchcombe
  • John Greenman
  • Virgilio Mattoli
  • Lucia Beccai
  • Barbara Mazzolai
  • Chris Melhuish
  • Ioannis A. Ieropoulos
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8717)

Abstract

A new generation of self-sustainable and wearable Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) is introduced. Two different types of energy - chemical energy found in urine and mechanical energy harvested by manual pumping - were converted to electrical energy. The wearable system is fabricated using flexible MFCs with urine used as the feedstock for the bacteria, which was pumped by a manual foot pump. The pump was developed using check valves and soft tubing. The MFC system has been assembled within a pair of socks.

Keywords

Microbial Fuel Cell Check Valve Nafion Membrane Heel Strike Wearable System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Majid Taghavi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Andrew Stinchcombe
    • 1
  • John Greenman
    • 4
  • Virgilio Mattoli
    • 2
  • Lucia Beccai
    • 2
  • Barbara Mazzolai
    • 2
  • Chris Melhuish
    • 1
  • Ioannis A. Ieropoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Bristol Robotics LaboratoryUniversity of the West of EnglandBristolUK
  2. 2.Center for Micro-BioRoboticsIstituto Italiano di TecnologiaPontedera (PI)Italy
  3. 3.BioRobotics InstituteScuola Superiore Sant’AnnaPontederaItaly
  4. 4.Faculty of Health and Applied SciencesUniversity of the West of EnglandBristolUK

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