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Affectivity and Temporality in Heidegger

  • Jan SlabyEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Phaenomenologica book series (PHAE, volume 216)

Abstract

Heidegger’s conception of affectivity, as developed for the most part in Being and Time, is reconstructed here with an emphasis on the temporal character of affectivity. While a good number of philosophers of emotion have borrowed from Heidegger’s approach, few have so far taken the temporal character of findingness [Befindlichkeit] into account. This paper has three main parts. The first part revisits the standard reading of Heideggerian affectivity, the second reconstructs the conception of ‘originary temporality’ at the core of Division II of Being and Time, while the third section undertakes an interpretation of the way Heidegger construes affectivity as various modes of the ‘ecstatic temporalizing of Dasein’. The main orientation of the paper is reconstructive. However, some implications for the philosophical study of emotion will be highlighted in the conclusion.

Keywords

Human Existence Ontological Structure Temporal Character Diachronic Uniqueness Profound Boredom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to Laurin Berresheim and Alexander Brödner for their highly helpful comments to an earlier version of this paper. Thanks also to Frank Esken and the members of his study project on normativity at University of Osnabrück for raising a number of very good points during a discussion session focused on an earlier draft. Special thanks to Daniel O’Shiel for cleaning up the worst amongst my routine abuses of the English language.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Free University BerlinBerlinGermany

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