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  • Johannes KonertEmail author
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Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses)

Abstract

As depicted before in Fig.  1.2 several research fields contribute to the results of this thesis. As such, one of the opportunities of this work is the interdisciplinary work and application of findings from pedagogy and sociology to the field of computer science. Thus, this chapter starts with the findings relevant for this thesis from the field of pedagogics intersecting with social media (Sect. 2.1) and afterwards with serious games (Sect. 2.2). The last section (Sect. 2.3) is most closely related to the thesis topic and states the findings on social network games in the intersection of serious games and social media (illustrated in Fig. 2.1). Each section will introduce the terms and models of pedagogy, serious games, and social media in the opening of each respective part. Finally, the chapter concludes with the key aspects to be addressed in the following chapters.

Keywords

Deep Learning Online Social Network Educational Game Massive Open Online Course Player Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical Engineering and Information TechnologyTechnische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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