Gamification and Law

On the Legal Implications of Using Gamified Elements
Chapter

Abstract

Games require rules, without rules there would not be any Gameplay (Kapp 2012: 29). Games are defined by the Game Design, which lays out the path: players may be able to choose a path on their own, or they may be bound to a certain route. Whether these rules (Salen & Zimmermann. Rules of play: Game design fundamentals. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press; 2003: 259) describe how a game is played (“Operational Rules”), are underlying formal structures which dictate game functionality (“Constitutional Rules”) or govern the social interaction between players (“Implicit Rules”), they are mandatory to keep the game system alive. In a game, a Game Master has to ensure these rules are followed (and everyone who has ever played Scrabble knows how hard this is), while in real life this responsibility is carried out by law enforcement authorities, courts and lawyers. This chapter will describe the legal implications involved, so stakeholders can avoid common risks and are also able to communicate to legal counsels efficiently.

Keywords

Gamification Law Consumer protection Liability 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fachhochschule des bfi Wien Ges. m.b.H.ViennaAustria

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