Steps towards a Challenging Teachable Agent

  • Annika Silvervarg
  • Camilla Kirkegaard
  • Jens Nirme
  • Magnus Haake
  • Agneta Gulz
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8637)

Abstract

This paper presents the first steps towards a new type of pedagogical agent – a Challenger Teachable Agent, CTA. The overall aim of introducing a CTA is to increase engagement and motivation and challenge students into deeper learning and metacognitive reasoning. The paper discusses desired design features of such an agent on the basis of related work and results from a study where 11-year old students interacted with a first version of a CTA in the framework of an educational software for history. The focus is on how students respond when the CTA disagrees and questions their suggestions, and how groups of students, differing in response behavior and in self-efficacy, experience the CTA.

Keywords

Teachable agent challenge interaction learning experience 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annika Silvervarg
    • 1
  • Camilla Kirkegaard
    • 1
  • Jens Nirme
    • 2
  • Magnus Haake
    • 2
  • Agneta Gulz
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Computer and Information ScienceLinköping UniversityLinköpingSweden
  2. 2.Cognitive ScienceLund UniversityLundSweden

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