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Ascribed Gender and Characteristics of a Visually Androgynous Teachable Agent

  • Camilla Kirkegaard
  • Betty Tärning
  • Magnus Haake
  • Agneta Gulz
  • Annika Silvervarg
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8637)

Abstract

This paper explores how users ascribe gender to a visually androgynous teachable agent, and if and how the ascribed gender can influence the perceived personality characteristics of the agent. Previous studies have shown positive effects of using agents with more neutral or androgynous appearances, for instance, a more gender neutral agent evoked more positive attitudes on females than did a more stereotypical female agent [1] and androgynous agents were less abused than female agents [2]. Another study showed that even though an agent was visually androgynous, the user typically ascribed a gender to it [3].

Keywords

Gender Stereotype Negative Word Positive Word Female Agent Digital Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Gulz, A., Haake, M.: Challenging Gender Stereotypes Using Virtual Pedagogical Characters. In: Goodman, S., Booth, S., Kirkup, G. (eds.) Gender Issues in Learning and Working with IT: Social Constructs and Cultural Contexts, pp. 113–132. IGI Global, Hershey (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Camilla Kirkegaard
    • 1
  • Betty Tärning
    • 2
  • Magnus Haake
    • 2
  • Agneta Gulz
    • 1
  • Annika Silvervarg
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer and Information ScienceLinköping UniversityLinköpingSweden
  2. 2.Cognitive ScienceLund UniversityLundSweden

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