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Multi-parameter Monitoring of a Slow Moving Landslide: Ripley Slide, British Columbia, Canada

  • Peter BobrowskyEmail author
  • Wendy Sladen
  • David Huntley
  • Zhang Qing
  • Chris Bunce
  • Tom Edwards
  • Michael Hendry
  • Derek Martin
  • Eddie Choi
Conference paper

Abstract

The Thompson River, south of Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada is a particularly unique area where complex glacial geology, active geomorphic processes and critical infrastructure (both major national rail lines—CPR and CN) intersect with and are affected by a long history of slope instability. Well documented landslides along a +10 km stretch of the valley have been impacting infrastructure as far back as the 19th century. The Ripley landslide is a small slow moving translational failure that is known to have been active since 1951. It poses a hazard to the onsite infrastructure since both the CN and CPR tracks run adjacent to each other along the entire breadth of the landslide. The economic repercussions of severing both railways here would be pronounced. In response to this threat, an extensive suite of monitoring technology is now being applied that includes: traditional applications including permanent monitoring using GPS stations and piezometers; subsurface investigations involving drilling and shallow seismic surveys; the adoption of novel technologies such as linear fibre optic sensing and vertical subsurface ShapeAccelArray (SAA) inclinometry, the installation of corner reflectors for satellite based (RADARSAT-2) interferometry and the deployment of ground-based SAR and LiDAR for ongoing quantitative assessment. Herein we summarize the collective efforts associated with this extensive array of instrumentation and monitoring studies being undertaken to better manage this and other landslide hazards in Canada and elsewhere.

Keywords

Landslide Railway Monitoring Fiber-optics Canada 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We gratefully recognize the direct financial support and in-kind contributions provided by the Government of Canada through Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada and NSERC, Government of China through the China Geological Survey, Canadian National Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway and the University of Alberta..

References

  1. Bunce CM, Chadwick I (2012) GPS monitoring of a landslide for railways. In: Eberhardt et al. (eds) Landslides and engineered slopes: protecting society through improved understanding, pp 1373–1379Google Scholar
  2. Clague JJ, Bobrowsky PT (2010) Natural hazards in Canada. Geosci Can 37(1):17–37Google Scholar
  3. Clague JJ, Evans SG (2003) Geologic framework for large historic landslides in Thompson River valley, British Columbia. Environ Eng Geosci 9:201–212Google Scholar
  4. Hendry M, Martin D, Choi E, Chadwick I, Edwards T (2013) Safe train operations over a moving landslide. In Proceedings of the 10th world congress on railway research, Sydney, Australia, pp 1–6Google Scholar
  5. Huntley D, Bobrowsky P (2013) Surficial geology and monitoring of the Ripley Landslide, near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada. Geological Survey of Canada Open File 7152, CanadaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Bobrowsky
    • 1
    Email author
  • Wendy Sladen
    • 1
  • David Huntley
    • 2
  • Zhang Qing
    • 3
  • Chris Bunce
    • 4
  • Tom Edwards
    • 5
  • Michael Hendry
    • 6
  • Derek Martin
    • 6
  • Eddie Choi
    • 4
  1. 1.NRCanGeological Survey of CanadaOttawaCanada
  2. 2.NRCanGeological Survey of CanadaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Centre for Hydrogeology & Environmental GeologyChina Geological SurveyHebeiChina
  4. 4.Canadian Pacific RailwayCalgaryCanada
  5. 5.Canadian National RailwayEdmontonCanada
  6. 6.Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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