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Remote Sensing and Hydrogeological Methodologies for Irrigation Canal Water Losses Detection: The Naviglio di Bra Test Site (NW-Italy)

  • Luigi Perotti
  • Manuela Lasagna
  • Paolo Clemente
  • Giovanna Antonella Dino
  • Domenico Antonio De Luca
Conference paper

Abstract

Different techniques and methods are available to detect water losses in irrigation canals. Traditional field survey methods (hydrological-hydrogeological and geophysics) are accurate but costly for regional studies. Remote sensing is a relative recent analysis and has been proposed as a promising quick and cost-effective methodology for determining, together with the traditional ones, the location of water losses. The paper presents a new multidisciplinary approach based on remote sensing and traditional field surveys for seepage identification in irrigation canal networks. It was conducted in the Naviglio di Bra, NW Italy. Multispectral images that combines visible and infrared sensors have been used to collect image data over the whole irrigation district. The images have been pre-processed and analyzed using ENVI software. After this first step, field hydrological-hydrogeological campaigns were performed to obtain image analysis feedback and losses quantification. This research established a satellite multispectral remote sensing method that provides high-resolution imaging data and detects leaks, and determines potential seepage of irrigation canals. Such technology would have widespread application in screening larger areas.

Keywords

Irrigation canals Water losses Remote sensing NDVI Tracer test 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luigi Perotti
    • 1
  • Manuela Lasagna
    • 2
  • Paolo Clemente
    • 2
  • Giovanna Antonella Dino
    • 3
  • Domenico Antonio De Luca
    • 2
  1. 1.Earth Sciences Department, GeositlabUniversità degli Studi di TorinoTurinItaly
  2. 2.Earth Sciences Department, HydrogeolabUniversità degli Studi di TorinoTurinItaly
  3. 3.Earth Sciences DepartmentUniversità degli Studi di TorinoTurinItaly

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