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International Conference on Computers for Handicapped Persons

ICCHP 2014: Computers Helping People with Special Needs pp 445-450 | Cite as

Extended Scaffolding by Remote Collaborative Interaction to Support People with Dementia in Independent Living – A User Study

  • Henrike Gappa
  • Gabriele Nordbrock
  • Manuela Thelen
  • Jaroslav Pullmann
  • Yehya Mohamad
  • Carlos A. Velasco
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8547)

Abstract

IT-based assistive services offer the potential to support the independent living of people with dementia provided that they accommodate their specific needs. Due to their declining cognitive functions, these users face among other issues a diminishing capacity for problem solving and attention focus. As a consequence they get easily distracted and finally lost while using assistive services. To counteract such situations it is necessary to implement scaffolding features that will assist users in navigating through all relevant sub-tasks. In our user study it was evaluated whether remote collaborative interaction —obtained by offering family carers remote access to assistive services running in the homes of the relatives they care for— could serve as an extended scaffolding feature. The user study has shown promising results because the vast majority of users even in later stages of dementia understood this concept and could achieve a task in collaborative interaction with their relatives.

Keywords

Mild Cognitive Impairment Cognitive Skill User Study Independent Living Usage Scenario 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henrike Gappa
    • 1
  • Gabriele Nordbrock
    • 1
  • Manuela Thelen
    • 2
  • Jaroslav Pullmann
    • 1
  • Yehya Mohamad
    • 1
  • Carlos A. Velasco
    • 1
  1. 1.Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology FITSankt AugustinGermany
  2. 2.Universitätsklinikum BonnBonnGermany

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